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to testify on the nato summit which the united states is proud to be hosting in chicago on may 20th and may 21st. with your permission, senator, i would like to submit my full statement and summarize my comments here. >> we appreciate and without objection the full statement will be in the record. >> i appreciate the support and the sustained recognition of the significance of this alliance, transatlantic security. this chicago summit will be the first on american soil in 13 years and the first ever outside of washington. in adang to the community to showcase our nation's great cities a symbol of nato to the united states. it is also an opportunity to underscore to the american people the continued value of this alliance and security challenges we face today. nearly 18 months ago the allies unveiled a new strategic concept for focus in the 21st century. building on the decisions taking in lisbon, the allies have three objectives. was a capabilities and partnerships and if i might, i'd like to say a few words about these. on afghanistan the isaf coalition has prevented that country from serv
, it david miliband, a former u.k. ambassador to the united states, and my former british colleague at nato. we have widespread support for this report. we are very grateful for their intellectual import and personal support, so that is what i wanted to say. at the order is for us to have a brief conversation, and then we will be happy to take whatever questions you have. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much for that. first of all, it is important to state that the atlantic council as a council does not take a point of view on anything, because it would just be too hard to get all of the members to agree, but i do think one thing we all agree on is a strong alliance and an enduring alliance, and this report points us in that direction. let me ask probably just two questions, and i will go to the audience right away, and two of the more controversial points, clearly, what you're saying on germany is tough, and it is saying it to a germany where many germans would argue, are we not doing the most important thing we could possibly do for the future of europe right now, which is aiding
for the united states and europe. i might add is also a great pleasure to see the french ambassador here this afternoon. thank you for the support that you gave 2 brookings, and that your predecessors gave to fiona hill, was -- and she would be addressing you from this lectern at the date of this conference, but she was locked into a commitment in beijing. but i want to assure you on behalf of brookings and the united states and europe that this does not represent a strategic pivot on the part of the institution or the center to east asia. it has been our pleasure, and i hope of some contribution to the policy community in partnership with the heinrich boll's foundation to bring the conference to you on an annual basis. and i think it is particularly appropriate that we should have filled with us today. -- phil with us today. he is secretary of state of european affairs and is responsible for u.s. policy toward about 50 countries, as well as three key -- and i would add to that currently, someone challenged international institutions -- the north of montreal organization, the european u
in the time i have been here. the french socialists are not strangers for the united states. they shouldn't be strangers. it has been true that it has been 17 years since the socialists were in power at the presidency. of course, they ran the government about a decade ago when spauo was in power. we have always had a very good relationship with any government that is there in france. i am confident we will have a good relationship with this government in france. we do have to see how this government is going to deal with the issues of the day. it's one thing to be campaigning. it is always something different to be governing. it is not me. it is not my job to predict how this will evolve. i will note that francoi francois hollande campaigned to keep france in the military structure. that was a remarkable statement after nicolas sarkozy to come back into the structure. i think france learned in the libya operation that being integrated in the command structure gives you a voice and say over what happens in the internal affairs of the military operation. that's important. you learn there ar
was that russia will also seek a predictable relationship with the united states. will adhere to the treaty on nuclear arms. and push for guarantees that the u.s. missile shield in europe will not be directed against russia. its that something that -- that he wants in writing or is that a trust but verify type of thing. or -- how, what does that mean? that statement? >> well we, have had a discussion with russia since -- since lisbon. where the nato allies agreed -- to, for the first time to deploy a -- a nato territorial missile defense system that would provide protection for nato european territories, populations and forces against a growing ballistic missile threat from outside of europe. that decision was not directed at russia. nor were the systems that were going to be deployed, capable of undermining strategic stability with russia or indeed undermine the nuclear deterrent of russia. we have been saying this for three years. we, we are, more than happy to put it in writing because we have already done so. would be happy to do it in the future. the second thing we did in lisbon was t
the united states and europe remain each other's best parkhurst and that when the american president or european leader looks how the public and says pudu one call when there's a problem of the person on the other side of the cleantech. my judgment is that is not going to change anytime soon partly because of the affinity of interest of the values and also there aren't other options and even though there are emerging countries out your waist count on our european allies and to rely on our european allies more than we can count on a cost-cutting. at the same time i think it's clear that we are at the cusp of a major historic transition in the global landscape in which the world that nato represents his losing the primacy it enjoyed the last 200 years and if you look at the share of global product represented by nato and i would include japan because they are a part of the western world since world war ii we've gone from roughly 70% of the global product to 50% and we are headed towards 40% and that says to me the big security question of the day are about how we are going to manage th
hamid karzai sits down for his only interview with me while in the united states. we talk about his personal relationship with president obama and even his personal relationship with mitt romney. stand by for that as well. >>> and the man sometimes nicknamed america's supermayor, has made a super gaffe. >>> i'm wolf blitzer in chicago. you're in the situation room. >>> but first, through my exclusive far reaching interview, i just completed only a few minutes ago with the afghan president hamid karzai, it's his only interview while here in the united states. we sat down only moments ago, and he spoke of president obama just minutes before the interview. the three leaders are here for a meeting in chicago. listen to this. >> no, we didn't have a three-way meeting, we had a three-way photograph taking. >> just a photo opportunity? >> why not a meeting? why not have a three-way meeting and discuss the most important issues facing afghanistan, pakistan and the united states. >> it wasn't for us to decide on the three-way meeting. the united states was the host and perhaps they saw it fi
disposal but will continue to ensure that its military a trained and will be working with the united states in that particular area. many other examples of this exist and i think the hope is that as we identify this brigade in the united states that will be rotating battalions to europe. possibly twice annually, although we're still working on the frequency of that, that will also be a way to enhance training in the alliance answer a new u.s. contribution to the nato response force and, again, we can get into those details in the q&a. i fear i've spoken too long already. i'm going to leave it at that and turn it over to the next person on the panel. thank you. >> julianne, thank you very much for rapidly going through what is a packed agenda, when you, start to look at these issues and it's very difficult in the time you have. you were very generous i think as well to describe britain's future defense struggles as a bell curve and i think within the u.k. they've been described as kind of black hole around $35 billion worth of defense expenditures which have been pushed into the future, beca
front of the u.s. capitol, this is half an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious fathe
of real significance to the united states. to do that, we will dedicate 80% of our effort to four major cases. right now they are syria, kenya, north/central america and burma. then we'll have another eight to ten places where we can test new approaches or make a welcome difference by just sending the the right person at the right time. so far i think we're gaining traction in each of our major priority engagements. many of you are working in these places, and we realize that we won't know it all or know best about them, so we hope for your support. in syria we are providing a nontraditional surge to empower and unite a fractured, nonviolent opposition. as the secretary announced, that includes providing nonlethal assistance. we are also working with partners to set up an outpost for the internal opposition to coordinate and communicate with the international community. in kenya we are helping to develop plans to insure peaceful and credible elections a year before the vote. incidentally, kenya is one place where we've seen a potential model for broad cooperation and innovation. in nort
geopolitics -- host: oil and gas production in the western hemisphere is booming, with the united states emerging less dependent on supplies from an unstable middle east. vens, nigeria, and mexico. host: southeast michigan. what are gas prices like there, dave? caller: very good. someone saying on your show that prices were falling for the holidays. that's not true here in southeast michigan, which people here like to drive a lot up north. we have a wonderful, beautiful up north. but the prices here average in the low $3.90's. they were a week ago in the mid $3.60, around there. for my employees, it's all the same for them. we're traveling 60 mile an hour round trips and that really hits the pocketbook when you're having to travel every day for week. i'll companies are certainly quick to bring the price down. thanks and have a good holiday. host: it's not our oil that we're talking about, it belongs to oil companies. new hampshire, john on our democrats line joins us. hi. caller: just one note i've acknowledged over the last few weeks. we have a caller on your show, but he was discussing
the veto word is not used, also not used in the constitution of the united states but no one doubts the president has it. we have the ability to do it to the language that is there. that will become a bit more clear as we come forward. >> thank you, chairman kerry. i'm very glad that we're having this in today and i appreciate all of you for being here. senator webb and i sent chairman kerry and ranking member luber a letter back in april urging we move forward to consideration of law of the sea treaty and i'm grateful to your broad and searching and supportive testimony here today. when i was brand-new to the senate, one of the earlier meetings i took was with the then outgoing chief of naval operations. when i asked him what is the single most important thing we can do to help the navy over the next decade, he said without hesitation, ratify the law of the sea treaty. i was taken aback by the. given other budget priorities, operational issues, as it turned out admiral estimation of the importance of this issue is shared i'm stomach every living chief of naval operations not to men
weekend, the united states faces military and diplomatic challenges. we will discuss stalled talks with iran and continuing tensions with pakistan, and the war in afghanistan. with one of the g.o.p.'s leading voices on foreign policy, senate john mccain. then, catholic institutions take the obama administration to court. over its insurance mandate on contraception. is it an issue of religious freedom? or women's health? we will ask a top church official pushing the legal challenge, cardinal wuerl archbishop of washington. plus, are president obama attacks on governor romney's business record working? and our power player of the week, a remarkable story of devotion to country and sacrifice you will not want to miss. all right now. on fox news sunday. and hello again on this memorial day weekend. from fox news in washington. as we remember those who is given their lives defending our country, we continue to face foreign policy challenges. here to tackle all of that is senator john mccain. welcome back to fox news sunday. >>guest: thank you for having me on especially memorial day. >>
is that the united states as a individual nation and nato collectively as an alliance have to do long-term thinking about where it. wants to be in ten or eight years time. and outline the type of missions it envisions undertaking in the future and what capabilities will be required to undertake the missions. and kind of set some -- identify some kind of priority areas for the alliance knowing that most allies simply aren't going to be able to do everything every time. not every ally will be able to do everything from peace keeping to high intensity combat. we have a number of al thrice have reached that point and are starting to specialize and develop these capabilities if it's not coordinated you could end up with everybody. it's like a pot luck dinner. you don't have any main course when everybody brings desert. the summit going to try to start the alliance on the healthier course. but it's also going to start first and foremost with delivering on some commitments made in lisbon. you might remember, the alliance watched the lisbon critical caimentn'ts commitment. where the alliance identified ten
are not strangers for the united states. it has been 17 years since the socialists have been in power and had the presidency. they ran the government a decade ago. we have always had a good relationship with any government that is there in france. i am confident we will have a good relationship with the government in france. we have to see how this government is going to deal with the issues of the day. i will keep france integrated in command structure -- he will keep france integrated into the command structure. that was a remarkable decision by sarkozy. the integrated in the command structure gives you a voice and a say over what happens in internal affairs of the military operation. it is important. there are benefits from being fully integrated. i would suspect this is a benefit that will remain even if there may be differences of degree as policies go on. that is what elections are all about, to enable the people to express themselves and vote in new governments who will have to decide how they want to pursue policies. on the big foreign policy issues, i expect more continuity. >> he ta
of death in latin america. does the scary parasitic disease pose a growing threat here in the united states? >>> and a runway emergency in chicago where a giant cargo jet collides with an airliner. we'll bring you the very latest. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> president obama telephones mitt romney, congratulates him for going over the top in the republican delegate count and over the top comments with supporter donald trump has created a distraction. you've heard trump question the birthplace in "the situation room," now romney is trying to move on. here's our national political correspondent, jim acosta. >> wolf, mitt romney has left las vegas, but donald trump is refusing to leave the campaign stage. >> americans are tired of being tired. >> now that he's crunched the number of delegates to win the gop nomination, it's victory lap time for mitt romney. get the checkered flag this new romney campaign video is all about the stars and stripes. >> we're united by one great, overwh overwhelming passion. we love america. we believe
of the united states refused to speak up on behalf of the demonstrators in the streets in tehran, and it has gone from one episode to another. we have over a year and now talking about possibly vetting some people. look, nearly 10,000 people have died this is a brutal regime of incredible proportions, and, by the way, if as sad fails in it would be the greatest blow to iran in the last 25 years because it would cut off the hezbollah, syria's most important client state, et cetera. but, look, horrible things are happening in syria and this administration has a feckless foreign policy which abandons american leadership. i know because i visit with these people, they are ready to help these people. they are already helping them some but it cries out for american leadership, and american leadership is not there. >>chris: there is a story on the front page of "new york times" that president obama is considering trying to get assad out diplomatically with the help of the russians. how likely is that? >>guest: again, he are here a year later, 10,000 killed and the main supplier of arms to assad, we
in latin america. many people are infected. what kind of threat does it pose in the united states? actually, the milk from my farm makes it so creamy, right dad. dad can see... boys! don't you think ouffer's steam perfect bag should get some credit? my carrots. my milk. [ female announcer ] new from stouffer's. farmers' harvest steam meals taste so good we'll bet the farm on it. oh, yeah? [ chris ] you can call us 24-7, get quotes online, start a claim with our smartphone app. you name it, we're here, anytime, anywhere, any way you want it. that's the way i need it. any way you want it. [ man ] all night? all night. every night? any way you want it. that's the way i need it. we just had ourselves a little journey moment there. yep. [ man ] saw 'em in '83 in fresno. place was crawling with chicks. i got to go. ♪ any way you want it ♪ that's the way you need it ♪ any way you want it ♪ ♪ any way you want it last season was the gulf's best tourism season in years. in florida we had more suntans... in alabama we had more beautiful blooms... in mississippi we had more good t
states. hispanic children are at the highest level of poverty in the history of the united states. i think the challenge is not how to bring them over to immigration reform or dialogue. just to make sure the latino community knows these facts and understands the failure of president obama. >> i agree with you there is a lot of ammunition. these comments about self deportation have indicated to some in the community he does not have respect for them. go to south texas and talk to latino ranch and farm owners and small businesses and members of the hispanic community. they are hard asses because they are the first to feel the adverse affect. cartels are shooting at them. are competing for jobs. there are a lot of reasons why they are hard asses but they do want to know the presidential candidate has respect for the community and in recognition this is not all a mexican problem. half the people here illegally came from hong kong the, nigeria on a visa and overstating it. the fact that all the people from central america are unworthy is a real problem. >> thank you. >> we will get behind
weight in the alliance and that europe and nato is heavily subsidized by the united states. if my view, this is a rather simplified and distorted view, not only of the nato budgetary process and how the public good of security shared, funded and measured in an alliance. nonetheless, having said that over the years, there have been many colorful warnings that describe these capabilities gap and the unequal burden sharing, and the number of speeches last year, robert gates probably did more than most to revive this debate, though for me i rather like one of the latest comments which robert kaplan referred to in an article last week. he cited a u.s. air force planner who was clearly exasperated by the shortfalls in key european capabilities during the libya intervention, and he described nato as like snow white and the 27 dwarfs. so the billion dollar question is this, can the smart defense approach a pooling of resources and integration of transatlantic, especially european military procurement to ensure the alliance retains needed capabilities even at a time when the allies are making d
and ask about the united states. the united states is calling again for air strikes in syria to protect these innocent civilians. why is the president not joining them? >> well, again, to conduct military operations you've got to have allies and support in the region surrounding. syria is vournded by friends of the united states, turkey, israel, jordan, iraq. at some point in time, again going back to libya, we had bases in the mediterranean from which we could conduct air campaign close air support that establish a no-fly zone. in order to be able to do that in this context, you need to have access to bases. one of these countries is going to have to pony up the bases. again, that takes the kind of coordination and building of a consensus to get where we need to go where decisive action becomes more possible. >> you hear these leaders saying there is no plan b when we talk about syria. thank you. let me get to this here. >> do we have a verdict? >> it doesn't seem like we have a verdict. there's been a swirl behind the scenes, if you will. there was a earlier note that came right befor
of this evening, ann-sofie moto, paul pullman, and the list of men and women in the united states armed forces, and his royal highness prince harry. this is really distinguished company indeed. [ applause ] general colin powell, maestro andrew previn, honorable members of the congress, excellencies is, members of the diplomatic core, participants, ladies and gentlemen, thank you as well for your warm welcome. and thank you to the board of the atlantic council, chairman hagel and president kempfe for this honor. i take it as a symbol of the partnership of the united states, the united nations, and on behalf of all the staff and peacekeeping operations staff. and imhumbly accept this honor. seldom if ever has our principles been more relevant. seldom if ever has this partnership been more vital than at this moment. ladies and gentlemen, we just celebrated and commented the list of men and women of u.s. armed forces. as the secretary general of the united nations, my thoughts are with more than 120,000 u.n. peacekeeping operation staff from more than 120 countries, contribution countries who are
for the united states, and if they weren't, by the way, you should be very worried because if we can't take on the syrian military, i don't know what enemy we can take on. so that's one important piece. here's a second important piece. what are our ideals for iran? well, they're the same as for everybody else. that the iranian people should live under a government that represents them, that doesn't owe press them, that doesn't kill people, doesn't murder women in the streets. i think we could go on. doesn't sponsor terrorism, doesn't seek nuclear weapons, doesn't share their work with syria as iran did or with north korea as it does to this today. if anybody saw the photos of north koreans in iran recently. so we want a better government in iran. how do we begin to get there? we begin to get there first by action in syria, second, by having a clear vision of what it is we seek to achieve there. we haven't had a clear vision of what we seek to achieve in iran since the revolution in 1979. we could have that clear vision. does that mean that we can achieve it? no. does that mean that we can c
between the united states and japan. today, we welcome you in that spirit. i have worked to strengthen the ties between our two nations. when prime minister noda and i met, we talk about strengthening. i want to thank you for the personal commitment you have brought to this endeavor. you have called the united states is japan's greatest asset. through our determination and humility we have seen this through. during our discussions today, the prime minister compared his leadership style to that of a point guard in basketball. he may not be flashy, but he stays focused and gets the job done. that has helped make this visit a milestone. am proud to announce we have agreed to a new joint vision to help shape the asian-pacific for decades to come. this is part of a broader effort i discussed in which the united states is, once again, beating in the asian-pacific region. this will remain the foundation of the security and foundations -- security and prosperity of our two nations and a cornerstone of regional peace and security. we reviewed the agreement that we reached last week to realign a
's a friend and ally of the united states. we are not calling for australian membership. we are calling for a partnership to develop. australia trains more energetically with germany and britain and france. you already trained significantly with the united states. let's say there is another humanitarian disaster the way there was in december of 2004 what happened on december 26th, australia, united states and japan and india deployed together to help the people of sri lanka and southern india because we had trained together in the air and sea. we want that type of cooperation. you have been a stalwart ally in afghanistan but you had to do it on the run not having worked very much with the european allies. it is inculcating patterns of cooperation and military training and confers no obligation on the part of parter countries. in essence it is the best of both worlds for the asia-pacific allies from my perspective. >> also hearing the most frequent complaint from australian officials is you are more than happy to use soldiers and resources in battle but we are not involved in the plannin
the effort? joining me now is james spidermarx. so, some u.s. lawmakers said the united states should take the lead and involve itself militarily. why is syria different than let's say libya. syria certainly had a greater population, a smaller piece of geography, therefore, it's a lot more urbanized and it becomes a very entangled and tough target to go against. unlike libya that had pocket of e resistance that were spread out and there seemed to be at some point, a unified opposition against gadhafi. so that answer to the question in terms of the difference between those two. in other words, it's a tougher nut to crack, a harder problem and would entangle us greatly. >> when you say something shouldn't be done, what is that something that should be done? >> well, clearly, what has to happen is the united, let's take it from the top and work our way down. united states is going to lose in this particular confrontation if russia brokers the deal to try to get assad to step aside. russia then is the peacemaker, russia owns the cards and have now caused this great con fill in syria to go away
be a more dangerous world if the united states were less involved and contributing less to the people and stability and had a weaker deterrent and less ability to dissuade people from engaging in the kinds of adventures that they would avoid were the united states seen as capable, engaged, and contributing to peace and stability. >> next question. mr. faust. >> earlier when you were speaking you mentioned that it's a -- >> this is not fair. they've got computers. he's sitting there reading. >> i can see it, mr. secretary. there's cartoons on it. >> that's a relief. okay. >> but earlier you mentioned, you said it's a battle of ideas referring to the war on terror and similar to the soviet union. but if that's the case, then shouldn't we be worried less about going to war and pre-emptive strikes and those measures and working more on soft power and making -- and focusing inward on america itself so that that way we'll be a country that people want to look up to and be like. because we're suffering from i'd say a lot of maladies right now that make other countries say oh, it doesn't seem
between the united states and afghanistan. not an agreement between individuals. it's a national agreement. entered into because it was in interests of the united states and afghanistan. the first thing. the second thing is that it is obligations on both sides. which we would seek to being implemented. obligations on the u.s. side and on the afghan side. >> okay. stephen and then we'll let tom go. >> how concerned is the u.s. that the continuing budget cuts and austerity in europe could have nato to xct act in the fut in a situation like libya? and growth in europe. do you expect any actions that could impact the economy, the european economy in a short term and obviously an effect on the u.s. economy? >> actions in what context? >> actions on growth rather than simply talking about how growth is an important factor. >> okay. with respect to nato and the way forward, one of the sessions indeed the first alliance session will be devoted to nato capabilities. and they have, the nato allies have undertaken a study over the last two years focused on those capabilities that if believes are esse
is at stake for the president of the united states politically? dave, i've downloaded a virus. yeah. ♪ dave, where are we on the new laptop? it's so slow! i'm calling dave. [ telephone rings ] [ male announcer ] in a small business, technology is all you. that's why you've got us. at the staples pc savings event, for a limited time get up to $200 off select computers. staples. that was easy. for a limited time get up to $200 off select computers. every communications provider is different but centurylink is committed to being a different kind of communications company. ♪ we link people and fortune 500 companies nationwide and around the world. and we will continue to free you to do more and focus on what matters. recently, students from 31 countries took part in a science test. the top academic performers surprised some people. so did the country that came in 17th place. let's raise the bar and elevate our academic standards. let's do what's best for our students-by investing in our teachers. let's solve this. i tell you what i can spend. i do my best to make it work. i'm back on the road
the challenges with less risk of damage to the economies of the rest of the world and the united states. >> if breeze is forced out of the euro before they get to this wonderful package of slower austerity and more growth? is forced out of the euro? >> europe as a whole has a very strong incentive in doing what it's gone to take to make monetary union work. that's what the reforms over the last six months have tried to do. they tried to put in place a set of mechanisms for discipline in fiscal policy and cooperating on fiscal policy, for sharing as of resources, for managing the financial system that need to make monetary union work. i think their decisions, confronted with this fear of broad erosion in your experiment, is to redouble their commitment to try to make this thing work. if we believe they have the ability to do that. we hope they manage this process. very difficult set of intelligence. >> to learn anything from their experience or is it totally different? >> the talent is are different, but if you listen to where we started this conversation, what we're trying to do is make
's in office because of a feeling that the united states abused his victory in the cold war, we moved nato in his face. we bombed serbia, we had a bunch every american advisors go there and help the -- john, russia is a natural ally of the united states and my judgment for this reason -- we have two potential adversaries coming, one is islamic world and the other is china. russia is as i say a natural ally because they have the same adversaries and i agree with obama, should you make an effort really to befriend or treat these people as equals and don't treat them the way we've ia $0obeen treating them the end of the cold war. >> putin issued apache to his ministers telling them to pursue amicable relations with the u.s. the contrast between the campaign rhetoric and the official marching orders could not be greater. >> good reason for both. when you -- there's a lot of hostility to the united states within the russian community. the russian people. and so if you're campaigning future re-election, which putin was, you certainly want to exploit that. now that he's governing, it becomes a v
's a very good example of where germany could lead in the future and help the united states and the united kingdom to rebuild our badly weak bridges to the russian leadership as president putin takes power and we must do this because russia's just too important and russia is both in some ways an adversary, not in military terms, but politically, but in some ways it's a friend and partner of the united states. we want to accentuate the friendship and partnership. i think chanceler merkel is perfectly placed to be that bridge for the u.s. to russia. >> terry murphy. good day, sir. quick comment and a two-part question. comment number one is you kind of overlooked the trans-atlantic business dialogue which has been going on for 20 years quite prominently. but secondly on the question of germany, last week i think it was captain harry whales, junior officer of the british army, got an award from the beneficiary council for his efforts to support the wounded warriors of britain and we know that the wounded warriors here are supported by the populous. there was a piece in the paper that wounded
today, what if anything should the united states be doing about this? conor powell is tracking the syrian story from just over the story in israel today. conor? >> reporter: megyn, finding the solution to end that bloodshed in syria seems to be fading with every passing day now. the international community is picking up diplomatic pressure on syria. the united states, great britain and other countries expelled syrian diplomats but that diplomatic pressure hasn't really changed the violence on the ground. it continues every single day. as you pointed out 13 people were found dead in eastern syria today by u.n. observers. they said their hands were bound and they were shot at close range. the city of homs has been just pounded in the last 24, 36 hours or so with a barrage of artillery and rockets coming from syrian forces. we don't know how many people have been killed in homs in the past day or so but it has the potential to be substantial. now that diplomatic pressure though doesn't seem to have much of an impact. today russia and china have given a boost to syria. both those c
for managing this transition i think it will withstand the test of time. at the united states in europe go their separate ways and figuring out how to preserve a rules-based system, then i hear that the next 20 or 30 years will be a very substantive period and international history. .. >> we are chasing to get out. we collectively, the reliance as you were just saying, senator, and i think it will be a long time coming before nato engages in the same kind of operation if engaged in in afghanistan. libya, i think the success more conclusive, but many of the conditions that were present in libya are not being replicated elsewhere, particularly in syria. a u.n. legal authority, the approval of the arab world, the degree to which libya was close to reservoirs of european power and, therefore, easy to the europeans did you even though they still relied heavily on us. in that regard i think some of the most important nato programs moving forward will not be the deployment of force, even though surely there will be some of that. they will be the broad array of programs, the partnerships, the medi
that the united states has now signed with afghanistan and nato, which has an enduring partnership agreement signed in lisbon. we'll start filling out what that means as well. >> sir? >> behind you. >> good to see you again. i'd like to get back to nato enlargement both in the north as well as the south. first of all, in the north sweden and finland have not asked to join, but they've really become almost allies in any sense of the word, we took part in the combat missions. in libya they're doing baltic air policing, swedes and finns are going to as i understand it, well, at any rate cooperating very closely. would you say a few words about cooperation? the second more important question has to do with macedonia. macedonia's secession to nato when the main dispute is solved but the international court of justice ruled that about six months ago that greece had no right, it was almost a unanimous decision, greece had no right on the 1995 agreement to keep, to block macedonia's membership in international organizations that while the negotiations are going on. sounds like the united states in a
attack in the united states in view of taking oath not to harm it when he was awarded his american citizenship. he responded that he lied when he took the oath. that shahzad's lie amount to betrayal and does not fall under permissible lying if the enemy during times of war. please request that pakistani taliban brothers to address this matter. also draw their attention to the fact that brother faisal shahzad appeared in photograph alongside commander f masoud. leader of attp. when he acquires american citizenship this requires taking an oath to not to harm america if he is unaware of this matter he should be informed of it. we must act swiftly to remove the suspicion that he engaged in the betrayal. the times square attempted attack was not only one that had the al qaeda no hand in pakistan. it is clear from the letters that the group's indiscriminate attacks, pakistani taliban's indiscrimenant attacks against muslims were of major concern to al qaeda. this led them to write a letter to respected brother massoud, the leader of the ttp. the authors explicitly stated that the satisfa
,000 syrians dead. today the only response was symbolic. eight countries including the united states expelling syrian diplomats. in the year when the president is running on his foreign policy victories syria is becoming a lightning rod. >> this administration has a foreign policy which abandons american leadership. i know because i visit with these people that they are ready to help these people and they are helping them some. it cries out for american leadership. >> and today mitt romney said the president's lack of leadership has resulted in a policy of paralysis and we should work with partners to arm the opposition. now, that is something a lot of people -- that's a lightning rod in itself. and the obama administration is holding firm on its stance of no military action. >> no military action is always an option. and we haven't in this case removed options from the table. we do not believe that militarization for the situation in syria at this point is the right course of action. we believe it would lead to greater chaos and greater carnage. >> but will american intervention stop blood sh
as an officer in the united states air force. after 26 years at the c.i.a. and national security council, he became president of texas and, a, many university. in 2006, president george w. bush appointed him sex tear of defense succeeding donald rumsfeld. under his watch, gates oversaw iraq's troop surge. president-elect obama asked him to stay in the job. he became the first defense secretary to serve both a republican and democratic president. in the obama administration he played a pivotal role in shaping u.s. policy in afghanistan. he was a key player in the decision to send additional forces into the country. he was at the center of the debate on the raid to kill osama bin laden last may. gates stepped down as defense secretary in june, 2011. here is what president obama said at gates' farewell ceremony. >> what you see is a man that i've come to know and respect. a humble american patriot. a man of common sense and decency. quite simply one of our nation's finest public servants. >> reporter: i talked with bob gates in williamsburg virginia at the college of william & mary where he acc
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